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Colin Gentry
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How to become a personal trainer

Written By

Colin Gentry

Category

Personal Training

Posted On

16 December 2016

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How to become a personal trainer

One of the great things about working in the fitness industry is how flexible it can be to your needs and what you want out of life. The life of a personal trainer can be varied, exciting and prosperous. It can be daunting beginning on the path to becoming a personal trainer but be brave, take the plunge and you won’t look back

Here are a few steps to become a certified personal trainer-

1 Do your research

The fitness industry welcomes people at many stages of life. From school-leavers and university graduates to those who have tried their hand at one vocation and wish to explore another, a career in fitness is open to all.

When you begin your search, you may find that there are a lot of course providers and a lot of courses out there, you might find yourself asking, what qualifications do I/you need to be a personal trainer. To start your career as a personal trainer you will need to pass a level 3 course. Level 3 gives the training to plan and deliver successful workouts to clients.  The course needs to be a REPs recognised qualification.

Beware, ‘Certificate’ and ‘Diploma’ are not interchangeable terms. A personal training course that leads to a REPs-recognised diploma qualification covers more information than one that leads to a certificate qualification. Some training providers advertise courses as diplomas when those courses actually lead to a certificate qualification.

2 Choose a mode of study

One of the great things about personal training with TRAINFITNESS is how flexible the qualification is to your lifestyle and needs. When searching, consider how long it takes to become a personal trainer and what your personal situation is.  Some people who want to qualify as quick as possible may wish to choose our intensive full-time study option, qualifying with a Level 3 Certificate in Personal Training in just four weeks. Others may have commitments such as a job to consider and so the part-time course is more suitable. The distance study option is great for those who want to study in their own time at home, anywhere in the world, and attend assessments when convenient for them.

3 Get qualified

Level 2, for a lot of people, is the entry point for a job in fitness. Completing the Level 2 Certificate in Fitness Instructing gives you a foundation of knowledge about anatomy and physiology, fitness principles and health and safety. This means you can, for example, work on the gym floor and deliver inductions to new members. You could also consider Pilates, exercise to music and yoga instructor qualifications.

To be a personal trainer requires progressing to Level 3. As well as giving a deeper knowledge of anatomy and nutrition, the Level 3 Certificate in Personal Training allows those who qualify to be able to plan and deliver successful workouts to their clients. If you do not hold a Level 3 personal training certificate, you are not able to call yourself a personal trainer.

Personal Training Courses

4 Get a Job

There are generally two types of employment scenarios once you’ve completed your personal trainer course. The first is an employed position where you earn a set salary, regardless of the number of personal training clients you have or the number of personal training sessions you perform. The second is a self-employed role where you pay a rental fee to the health club (or clubs) you operate in. When self-employed, your clients generally pay you directly, rather than pay the club, and your income increases the more personal training sessions you perform.

5 Find your niche

CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development. CPD is a way for exercise professionals to demonstrate that they continue to learn and develop throughout their careers, and keep their knowledge up to date.

CPD can also set you apart from the pack. In a gym full of personal trainers, perhaps you will be the only one qualified in teaching kettlebells and Olympics lifts, making you the go-to for those training for muscle mass. Or perhaps you’re in an area full of expectant mothers that mean being trained in ante- or post-natal fitness will give you the edge.

Consider how your career path might look in 5-10 years. Perhaps you will move into life coaching, work with exercise referral clients, set up your own business or run your own gym? Whatever you do to specialise and stand out, make sure you’re passionate about it.

Find out more about becoming a personal trainer

Contact us for more information on personal training courses

 


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