CALL US 0207 2929 140

Menu
Personal Trainer Blogs

PERSONAL TRAINER & FITNESS BLOGS

Banner Iamage Hazel Goudie
2 MIN READ

Working With Clients Who Have a Disability

Written By

Hazel Goudie

Category

Clients with a Disability

Posted On

6 March 2015

Share Article

The Inclusive Fitness Initiative (IFI) was set up in the early 2000’s by the English Federation of Disability Sports (EFDS) in response to some research which identified that disabled people were being excluded from the opportunities of regular participation in facility-based fitness and sports activities.

Therefore since 2001 the IFI has worked towards an ambition of providing every disabled person in England with access to an inclusive fitness facility (a suitable distance from home). This was helped between 2001 and 2006 when the IFI received £6 million from the Sport England Lottery Fund. In 2007, IFI launched a new programme which was given funding of £1.95 million by the National Sports Foundation to encourage more grassroots sports access for disabled people.

Therefore since the late 1990’s-early 2000’s, there has been a steady growth in the diversity of populations frequenting our fitness facilities. This has led to a significant shift in the type of participant and overall perception of those who use our fitness facilities across England – possibly peaking after the 2012 Paralympic Games. There is now a wide spectrum of gym users ranging from healthy adolescent and adults, looking for health and fitness gains to those with conditions referred by their healthcare professional as well as those with varying disabilities.

So with the correct training and qualifications, you as fitness instructors (gym, ETM, water-based) and Personal Trainers have the prospect to broaden your client base – with an estimated 1 in 10 of the UK population having some form of disability. Not only that, you have the opportunity to diversify your skills and knowledge and challenge your interpersonal skills by working with clients with varying disabilities.

By working with disabled clients you will be upskilling into a growing and evolving market in terms of clients, equipment and facilities available. This market is still relatively new for the fitness industry and this is reflected in the fact that once qualified you will be one of only around 100 instructors holding this REPs accredited qualification. In addition to this, there is also the opportunity to draw down funding from local charities and grants for inclusive exercise initiatives. Therefore if you a self-employed instructor/PT you could gain funding if you chose to work with disabled clients.

It should be remembered that not only will you be diversifying your job role and career pathway, but you can also embark on a journey which will be hugely rewarding both for you and your clients. As you can imagine disabled clients’ goals will differ greatly to your usual clients with emphasis focussing much more on maximising limited function and independence. Seemingly small advances in the gym will see huge lifestyle improvements for disabled clients in their home and social/work life and being a part of that is priceless.

If you are interested in working with disabled clients and want more information on the courses available. Please contact tutor support on 0845 257 8571.


blog comments powered by Disqus



  • Written By

    Tom Godwin

    Category

    Exercise Referral

    Posted On

    6 January 2014

    Osteoporosis is an increasingly common condition, exercise and lifestyle interventions can greatly help to improve the functionality and therefor the lives of sufferers. This short article outlines the basics that a personal trainer should be aware of in order to help an osteoporotic get the very most from their exercise regime in a safe and productive environment.

  • Written By

    Tom Godwin

    Category

    Exercise Referral

    Posted On

    28 April 2016

    Arthritis is a condition that effects many clients in the UK and as a fitness professional there is a strong chance at some point during your career you will work with a client who may be suffering with arthritis. There are two types of arthritis that people can suffer with: Osteoarthritis this is where there is damage to the cartilage of a joint and is most commonly due to wear and tear. This is normally localised and common in hips and knees, or any joints that have seen excessive use. The condition will greatly effect movement and results in pain, leading to in many cases a loss in the level of functional ability. It is generally localised to the joints effected, and does not spread. This condition is brought on by obesity, repetitive movement patterns, impact through the joint, or trauma.

  • Written By

    Tom Godwin

    Category

    Exercise Referral

    Posted On

    20 January 2014

    Asthma is a common condition that personal trainers come across in the fitness environment. In many cases asthma is viewed as a non-condition and ignored, this should not be the case. Personal trainers should be aware of the implications of asthma and how to make sure that their clients are screened effectively prior to the start of an exercise routine. This screening should then form the basis of any exercise programmes generated to make sure the programme is not just effective but safe. So what exactly is asthma, well it is a condition where there is a temporary and reversible narrowing of the airways. This is signalled by shortness of breath, wheezing a tightening in the chest and on some occasions a cough. Asthma attacks can vary massively in terms of severity, with extreme cases requiring an ambulance. Eventually the condition can lead to the onset of COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder) or become classed as chronic asthma.

  • Written By

    Colin Gentry

    Category

    General Fitness, Personal Training

    Posted On

    28 November 2016

    If anyone knows about powerlifting, it's Elite World Class Powerlifter Jackson Hinch. The U110kg GPC World Champion, Jackson hit a 295kg squat, 190kg bench Press, and a 300kg deadlift. It's no surprise, therefore, that he is in demand as a personal trainer who knows their stuff when it comes to strength training.

  • Written By

    Katy Moore

    Category

    fx - Group Exercise Programmes, T3 fight

    Posted On

    22 April 2016

    While travelling up and down the UK, over to Saudi Arabia and then to Shanghai to deliver instructor training in our fight fx programme, I find myself being asked the same questions. I sense a degree of frustration in newly qualified fight fx instructor’s voices as they ask; it’s almost as if they don’t want to ask but know they must so they have the answers to the questions members are asking.

  • Written By

    Hazel Goudie

    Category

    Personal Training

    Posted On

    24 November 2014

    Those of you who work or have worked in the diverse industry of fitness will be well aware of the unique, fulfilling and evolving job Personal Trainers have and the positive effects you can have on the people and communities they serve. For those of you looking to embark on a career in fitness and seeking insight into the typical day of a Personal Trainer then this is the article for you. Or if you already work as a Personal Trainer you can get some ideas about what other like-minded fitness professional do on a day-to-day basis. Fitness Industry Education have interviewed two successful Personal Trainers, asking them to give use their view of ‘being a Personal Trainer’. These two very different yet talented Personal Trainers, have created niche products as PT’s as well as offering a wider range of services to diverse markets in their local areas.